Rabbit

Read in another language

Watch this page

Edit

For the woodworking term, see Rabbet. For the musician, see Rabit (musician). For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation).

“Bunny” redirects here. For other uses, see Bunny (disambiguation).

Rabbits are small mammals in the familyLeporidae of the order Lagomorpha (along with the hare and the pika). Oryctolagus cuniculus includes the European rabbitspecies and its descendants, the world’s 305 breeds[1] of domestic rabbit. Sylvilagusincludes 13 wild rabbit species, among them the 7 types of cottontail. The European rabbit, which has been introduced on every continent except Antarctica, is familiar throughout the world as a wild prey animal and as a domesticated form of livestock and pet. With its widespread effect on ecologies and cultures, the rabbit (or bunny) is, in many areas of the world, a part of daily life—as food, clothing, a companion, and as a source of artistic inspiration.Rabbit

Temporal range: Late Eocene-Holocene, 53–0 Ma 

PreЄ

Є

O

S

D

C

P

T

J

K

Pg

N

Scientific classificationKingdom:

Animalia

Phylum:

Chordata

Subphylum:

Vertebrata

Class:

Mammalia

Order:

Lagomorpha

Family:

Leporidae
in part

Genera

Pentalagus

Bunolagus

Nesolagus

Romerolagus

Brachylagus

Sylvilagus

Oryctolagus

Poelagus

Terminology

Male rabbits are called bucks; females are called does. An older term for an adult rabbit is coney, while rabbit once referred only to the young animals.[2] Another term for a young rabbit is bunny, though this term is often applied informally (especially by children) to rabbits generally, especially domestic ones. More recently, the term kit or kitten has been used to refer to a young rabbit.

A group of rabbits is known as a colony or nest (or, occasionally, a warren, though this more commonly refers to where the rabbits live).[3] A group of baby rabbits produced from a single mating is referred to as a litter,[4] and a group of domestic rabbits living together is sometimes called a herd.[5]

Taxonomy

Rabbits and hares were formerly classified in the order Rodentia (rodent) until 1912, when they were moved into a new order, Lagomorpha (which also includes pikas). Below are some of the genera and species of the rabbit.

Brachylagus Idahoensis
Pygmy rabbit

Nesolagus netscheri
Sumatran Striped Rabbit
(Model)

Oryctolagus cuniculus
European rabbit
(Feral Tasmanian specimen)

Pentalagus furnessi
Amami rabbit
(Taxidermy specimen)

Romerolagus diazi
Volcano rabbit
(Taxidermy specimen)

Sylvilagus aquaticus
Swamp rabbit
(Juvenile)

Sylvilagus audubonii
Desert cottontail

Sylvilagus bachmani
Brush rabbit

Sylvilagus brasiliensis
Tapeti
(Taxidermy specimen)

Sylvilagus palustris
hefneri
Lower Keys
marsh rabbit

Order Lagomorpha 
    Family Leporidae 

Genus Brachylagus

Pygmy rabbit, Brachylagus idahoensis

Genus Bunolagus

Bushman rabbit, Bunolagus monticularis

Genus Lepus ← NOTE: This genus is considered a hare, not a rabbit

Genus Nesolagus

Sumatran striped rabbit, Nesolagus netscheri

Annamite striped rabbit, Nesolagus timminsi

Genus Ochoronidae ← NOTE: This genus is considered a pika, not a rabbit

Genus Oryctolagus

European rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus

Genus Pentalagus

Amami rabbit / Ryūkyū rabbit, Pentalagus furnessi

Genus Poelagus

Central African Rabbit, Poelagus marjorita

Genus Prolagidae ← NOTE: This genus is extinct.

Genus Romerolagus

Volcano rabbit, Romerolagus diazi

Genus Sylvilagus

Swamp rabbit, Sylvilagus aquaticus

Desert cottontail, Sylvilagus audubonii

Brush rabbit, Sylvilagus bachmani

Forest rabbit, Sylvilagus brasiliensis

Mexican cottontail, Sylvilagus cunicularis

Dice’s cottontail, Sylvilagus dicei

Eastern cottontail, Sylvilagus floridanus

Tres Marias rabbit, Sylvilagus graysoni

Omilteme cottontail, Sylvilagus insonus

San Jose brush rabbit, Sylvilagus mansuetus

Mountain cottontail, Sylvilagus nuttallii

Marsh rabbit, Sylvilagus palustris

New England cottontail, Sylvilagus transitionalis

Hare
Johann Daniel Meyer (1748)

Rabbit
Johann Daniel Meyer (1748)

Differences from hares

Main article: Hare

Hares are precocial, born relatively mature and mobile with hair and good vision, while rabbits are altricial, born hairless and blind, and requiring closer care. Hares (and cottontail rabbits) live a relatively solitary life in a simple nest above the ground, while most rabbits live in social groups underground in burrows or warrens. Hares are generally larger than rabbits, with ears that are more elongated, and with hind legs that are larger and longer. Hares have not been domesticated, while descendants of the European rabbit are commonly bred as livestock and kept as pets.

Domestication

Main article: Domestic rabbit

Rabbits have long been domesticated. Beginning in the Middle Ages.